Career Planning

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==Why is it important to plan your career?==
==Why is it important to plan your career?==
*Without a clear plan it is difficult to achieve clear results, especially when you will have so many things pulling you in different directions -- research, teaching, service, family versus work, etc.
*Without a clear plan it is difficult to achieve clear results, especially when you will have so many things pulling you in different directions -- research, teaching, service, family versus work, etc.
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*Strategic planning on how to spend your limited time and resources will help you more '''effeciently and effectively''' achieve your goals.
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*Strategic planning on how to spend your limited time and resources will help you more '''efficiently and effectively''' achieve your goals.
*Setting Goals is the first and most important step because research has shown that goal setting is best way to both create an ''objective''' and the '''motivation''' to achieve the objective.
*Setting Goals is the first and most important step because research has shown that goal setting is best way to both create an ''objective''' and the '''motivation''' to achieve the objective.
*At the most basic level you need to know what activities further your goals and which activities do not. While this may seem simple to differentiate between the two, you may find that your career goals and the expectations of your department overlap in some ways but not others.  
*At the most basic level you need to know what activities further your goals and which activities do not. While this may seem simple to differentiate between the two, you may find that your career goals and the expectations of your department overlap in some ways but not others.  
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*During the job search process you probably learned about the school's relative weighting of research and teaching.
*During the job search process you probably learned about the school's relative weighting of research and teaching.
*During the interview process asking key questions is an important starting step in learning how the school specifically weights research and teaching.  See below for [[#What questions should I ask?|what questions to ask]].
*During the interview process asking key questions is an important starting step in learning how the school specifically weights research and teaching.  See below for [[#What questions should I ask?|what questions to ask]].
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*Talk to people at every level -- Dean, Department Chair, senior faculty, junior faculty, etc.  Some of the questions you would ask are the same at every level, such as what are your expectations of me; some of the questions will be different at every level, such as wanting to know from junior faculty what was the most difficult part of your adjustment to the department, and wanting to learn from senior faculty what were the difference between those who recieved tenure and those who did not in the 10 years.
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*Talk to people at every level -- Dean, Department Chair, senior faculty, junior faculty, etc.  Some of the questions you would ask are the same at every level, such as what are your expectations of me; some of the questions will be different at every level, such as wanting to know from junior faculty what was the most difficult part of your adjustment to the department, and wanting to learn from senior faculty what were the difference between those who received tenure and those who did not in the 10 years.
*Ask as many people as possible because hopefully there will be agreement between them. If there is not perfect overlap, at the very least you want to find commonalities by triangulating similar information from different sources. But what if you find inconsistent information? -- see the section below about [[#What to do if conflicting expectations? | What to do if you find conflicting information]].
*Ask as many people as possible because hopefully there will be agreement between them. If there is not perfect overlap, at the very least you want to find commonalities by triangulating similar information from different sources. But what if you find inconsistent information? -- see the section below about [[#What to do if conflicting expectations? | What to do if you find conflicting information]].
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*Learn about their expectations and goals before providing information to them about your own. Why? Because you don't want to underestimate (and provide them a negative opinion about what they may percieve as laziness or underachievement) and you don't want to overestimate (and set too high of a goal that could diminish your chances of success).
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*Learn about their expectations and goals before providing information to them about your own. Why? Because you don't want to underestimate (and provide them a negative opinion about what they may perceive as laziness or underachievement) and you don't want to overestimate (and set too high of a goal that could diminish your chances of success).
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*
*
*
===What questions should I ask?===
===What questions should I ask?===
#What is expected of me?
#What is expected of me?
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#In the last 10 years, how many people recieved tenure?
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#In the last 10 years, how many people received tenure?
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#What were the difference between those who recieved tenure and those who did not?
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#What were the difference between those who received tenure and those who did not?
#What resources exists for helping me achieve my goals
#What resources exists for helping me achieve my goals
#What is the expected level of research, teaching, and service (RTS)? Be sure to quantify what they expect of you. Some schools split the RTS as 40%, 40%, 20%, but what does 40% mean? What does 20%?  
#What is the expected level of research, teaching, and service (RTS)? Be sure to quantify what they expect of you. Some schools split the RTS as 40%, 40%, 20%, but what does 40% mean? What does 20%?  
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===You===
===You===
*The most important person for your professional development is you!
*The most important person for your professional development is you!
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*It is also important to know your department's expecations before you start strategically planning your own career. Why? Because you need to fit your own goals within the larger objective of obtaining tenure.
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*It is also important to know your department's expecatations before you start strategically planning your own career. Why? Because you need to fit your own goals within the larger objective of obtaining tenure.
===Concrete===
===Concrete===
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===Evaluation===
===Evaluation===
*Putting each step down on paper allows you the ability to evaluate your own progress.
*Putting each step down on paper allows you the ability to evaluate your own progress.
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*You should evaluate yourself every year because you need to identify how much progress has been made in comparison to your expecations; and more importantly, you need to identify *why* you may not have accomplished as much as expected.
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*You should evaluate yourself every year because you need to identify how much progress has been made in comparison to your expectations; and more importantly, you need to identify *why* you may not have accomplished as much as expected.
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*Be prepared to revise or modify your plan as unforseen issues arise or as you learn more about how much time/effort will be required to accomplish your steps.
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*Be prepared to revise or modify your plan as unforeseen issues arise or as you learn more about how much time/effort will be required to accomplish your steps.
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*
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==Worksheets to help you==
==Worksheets to help you==
*At this point you have learned about [[#Your Department's Expectations|Your Department's Expectations]] and [[#Your Career Goals|Your Career Goals]].
*At this point you have learned about [[#Your Department's Expectations|Your Department's Expectations]] and [[#Your Career Goals|Your Career Goals]].
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*Now it is time to integrating all the expections and goals into a Strategic Plan.
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*Now it is time to integrating all the expectations and goals into a Strategic Plan.
*First, categorize your activities into Research, Teaching, and Service.
*First, categorize your activities into Research, Teaching, and Service.
*Second, for each category you are going to identify: (1) your GOALS, (2) your PLAN to attain the goals, and (3) the intended COMPLETION DATE.
*Second, for each category you are going to identify: (1) your GOALS, (2) your PLAN to attain the goals, and (3) the intended COMPLETION DATE.

Revision as of 08:58, 10 February 2008

Contents


Why is it important to plan your career?


Your Department's Expectations

How to learn what is expected of you?

What questions should I ask?

  1. What is expected of me?
  2. In the last 10 years, how many people received tenure?
  3. What were the difference between those who received tenure and those who did not?
  4. What resources exists for helping me achieve my goals
  5. What is the expected level of research, teaching, and service (RTS)? Be sure to quantify what they expect of you. Some schools split the RTS as 40%, 40%, 20%, but what does 40% mean? What does 20%?
  6. Is the evaluation process formal or informal?
  7. How am I going to be evaluated?
  8. Is the evaluation conducted each year or every other year?

What to do if conflicting expectations?


Your Career Goals

You

Concrete

Obtainable

Measureable

Evaluation



Worksheets to help you



For more information...




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